NBN
(National Broadband Network)

The Nations Future



NBN - So What Is It All About?

Essential NBN Network?

The nbn™ network is essential for Australia’s digital evolution and is designed to provide access to a minimum level of broadband services across the nation. It presents opportunity in education, business, entertainment, health care and sociability giving everyone the potential to be more productive, more creative, more efficient and more connected for decades to come.

What Is The NBN Network?

The aim is to enable access to fast, reliable and affordable phone and internet services, from a range of providers. The nbn™ network is designed to enable lifestyle enhancements including health, education, well-being, sustainability and wealth.

nbn™ are committed to closing the digital divide by providing access to a minimum level of broadband services to homes and businesses across Australia. Due to the nature and size of our country, they plan to use a mix of technologies to deliver the nbn™ network, using the best fit solution for each area.

Information About The Service

The NBN fibre service is a broadband internet service which uses the NBN optical fibre access network to deliver internet connectivity at the network Boundary Point at your Premises.

Requirements & Availability

The NBN fibre service is only available within an NBN fibre service area, unless your premises is already connected, you will need to be connected to the NBN optical fibre access network. Standard installations are done without charge to you ; non-standard installations may require you to pay charges.
You will require an NBN ready router if you wish to connect multiple devices at once to your NBN fibre services. If you don’t already have one, we can sell or rent you a suitable device at an additional cost.

NBN Technologies That Are Available

  • Fibre to the Premises (FTTP)
    NBN Fibre to the premises connection (FTTP) is used in circumstances where a optic fibre line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, to your premises.  FTTP also requires and nbn network device to be installed inside your home.  This device requires power to operate and can only be installed by an approved nbn installer or service provider.
  • Fibre to the node (FTTN)
    An nbn Fibre to the node (FTTN) connection is utilised in circumstances where the existing copper network will be used to make the final part of the nbn network connection, from a nearby FTTN cabinet or micro-node to your premises.  The fibre node is likely to take the form of a street cabinet.  Each street cabinet will allow the nbn network signal to travel over optic fibre from the exchange to the cabinet, and connect with the existing copper network to reach your premises
  • Fibre to the building (FTTB)
    An nbn Fibre to the building (FTTB) connection is generally used when we are connecting an apartment block or similar types of buildings to the nbn network.  In this scenario a fibre optic line is run to the building communications room, the existing technology in the building is then used to connect to each apartment
  • Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC)                                                                                                                                                                                            An nbn Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) connection is used in circumstances where the existing 'Pay TV' or cable network can be used to make the final part of the nbn network connection.  In this circumstance a HFC line will be run from the nearest available fibre node, to your premises.  Hybrid fibre coaxial (HFC) connections require an nbn network device to be installed a the point where the HFC line enters your home.  This device requires power to operate, and can only be installed by an approved nbn installer or service provider
  • Fixed Wireless                                                                                                                                                                                                                A fixed wireless connection is typically used in circumstances where the distance between premises can be many kilometers.  In this circumstance data travels from a transmission tower located as much as 14 kms from a premises to a rooftop antenna that has been fitted by an approved nbn installer.  Fixed wireless connections also require an nbn network device to be installed at the point where the cable from the roof antenna enters your home.  This device requires power to operate, and can only be installed  by an approved nbn installer or service provider

New Development Fee

Effective 1 April 2016, the $330 New Development Fee is charged for all nbn broadband connections (FTTP, FTTB, FTTN, HFC and Wireless) in the following circumstances:

  • ​The first connection at a premises in a newly development area i.e., a suburb with no pre-existing telecommunications infrastructure
  • The first connection(s) at a premises in an established area in the rare instance that a developer has increased the number of dwellings on the same plat of land e.g. demolished a single house and built a block of units

Once the NDF has been charged at an address, it will not be charged again for subsequent connections, provided the number of dwellings at that address has not increased

Battery Backup and Power Outages

NBN FTTP services have the ability to operate during a power outage if a battery backup unit (BBU) is installed.  A BBU is available only on NBN FTTP.  In order for your service to work in a power outage please be aware that;

  • ​You must have an active BBU installed.  (This is optional and you can elect to get this installed at no extra cost when you in initially apply for an NBN FTTP service)
  • Access to the internet will only be available with a battery powered device (like a laptop) by connecting directly to the data port (UNI-D) on the NBN Connection Box (NTD)
  • During a power outage, the battery will provide power for a limited period of time, a fully charged battery will last between 3 and 11 hours.  If the battery is not fully charged it may last for less than 3 hours

What This Means For You

Without getting too emotional, this powerful new network will change your life and the lives of every other Australian forever.
The data below are based on comparison of a standard ADSL2+ service with average speed of 6Mbps and a 100Mbps NBN fibre service

Why Does Australia Need NBN?

Australia has already made the jump from dial-up to broadband, but now we are all leaping from broadband to the new age of superfast internet.
Over the next decade, they'll be laying down 200,000km of it. That's pretty much five times the circumference of the earth. When they're really hitting their stride, they'll be hooking up 6,000 homes a day. By the time they're done, pretty much every Australian home will have access to super-fast internet.

Please click on the title below for drop down options:

Information Videos

NBN/Fibre Broadband User Guide

Congratulations on connecting to the National Broadband Network (NBN) through your chosen service provider.
The following videos provide information on how to ensure your NBN connection equipment stays in good working order. It also outlines what to do should your system not work properly, and how to change the battery should you need to.

Please click on the titles below for drop down options:

Getting Started Videos

Getting To Know Your NBN FTTP Equipment

Help With Your NBN Equipment

NBN Fibre To The Premises (FTTP) Equipment – Battery Backup Service Information